Home > Uncategorized > I Am The Town Taker, Pete & Warrior’s Housewarming, Pale Blue Dots, and more

I Am The Town Taker, Pete & Warrior’s Housewarming, Pale Blue Dots, and more

I realized today that I’m now wholly reliant on a cup of coffee to keep me awake throughout the course of an entire day. Sad, huh?

After an impromptu afternoon nap that’s directly attributable to the aforementioned dependence on caffeine, my sister stopped by with the twins, whom she was watching because my brother-in-law was at a wedding and my oldest sister was at work. They had just come back from McDonald’s, where they received these really odd Happy Meal trinkets – necklaces hawking the DVD re-release of “The Little Mermaid” that had a picture of Ariel that when pressed said “isn’t it FANTASTIC?” Very odd, and the delivery combined with poor sound quality made it sound like something out of a Japanese horror movie. Well, hilarity ensued when the twins insisted that she wasn’t saying “isn’t it fantastic,” but rather “you are the Town Taker.” What exactly makes someone a Town Taker is unknown, but I imagine it’s someone dressed like Genghis Khan who rides into small municipalities and completely decimates them. For whatever reason, a consensus was reached among my nieces and sister that I was The Town Taker.

Lock your fucking doors, Colonie!

Shortly thereafter, Steve (dreg4life) and I ate dinner at the Dragon Buffet. I’m pretty sure it’s “Dragon”…if not, it’s some other cliche word that’s in the name of at least one Chinese restaurant in any given 10-mile radius. As usual it was cheap and the quality of food was passable, but much better than it would have been otherwise since up until that point it hadn’t occurred to me that I should eat food. After gourging ourselves we hung out at my place for a bit before going to Pete and The Warrior’s all-day/all-night housewarming gathering. They’ve really got the most adorable house, and it was good to see people that I haven’t seen much of as of late due to the whole sobriety thing. I don’t miss the lifestyle, but I miss the people like crazy. Unfortunately I missed Artie and Pregnant Leesa by a few hours.

Art and Lees – please call me when the ultrasound reveals the horns on that child’s head.

While there, an acquaintance of mine was insistent on having a margarita with me, temporarily forgetting that I didn’t drink anymore. It was completely understandable since I imagine it was probably mentioned to her only a handful of times, so I wasn’t offended or bothered by it in the least. Once she remembered she started apologizing profusely. On the way home, I felt awful because I got the feeling I should’ve done more to re-assure her that it wasn’t a problem in the least and certainly didn’t create a “moment of crisis” for me. I mean, I’m sure it might in some recovering alcoholics, but fortunately I’m not some recovering alcoholics. So if she’s reading this – seriously, no reason to feel bad about it. And if you don’t, then awesome!

Speaking of which, I didn’t go to the AA meeting today. I’ll go tomorrow. I intended to go this afternoon, but found I wasn’t in the mood for someone (there’s always one) who starts using the meeting as a therapy couch with little to no connection to their alcoholism until they add it as an afterthought or addendum when the thought occurs to them that it bears absolutely no relevance to their alcoholism. That and the whole “drinking then gives me a pass to be an asshole now” thing. I know I would (and probably will) catch heat from people in AA who read this, but I really don’t think that perpetually using the disease as an excuse for super-dickery is beneficial to the long-term growth and reformation as a human being that’s supposed to come with the program.

No, I still don’t have a sponsor; and yes, I usually only attend meetings once a week and sometimes don’t even make that. I’m sure that makes me a really bad AA person, and I’m sorry to say it doesn’t bother me as much as it would bother others. Nobody who has ever known me could say that I’m conventional in my approach to anything, and I say that only as a means of explanation rather than a boast of any unique attitude or bucking of the program’s guidelines. I believe the program is beneficial, but on the same token I also believe that there absolutely are people who are hiding out in AA who annoy me to no end (which I admit is a pretty bad character flaw on my point). So yeah, someone else in the program can say that it means I’m playing with fire and putting myself directly into the path of relapse, but I have and will prove them wrong on both points.

Back to the events of the day, after leaving the housewarming party Steve and I hung out for a little bit. We got back in time to catch “Bleach” on Adult Swim, which I’m still enjoying but am suspecting with each subsequent episode really suffers from the English dubbing. Afterwards we finished watching the first disc of the Cromartie High School DVD. Without delving too much into it, the show could be summarized as a spoof of animes of all types. The humor’s surreal at times, but it’s hilarious and the jokes don’t rely on aspects of Japanese culture and society that are completely alien to American audiences (eg. the painfully unfunny “Super Milk Chan”). And the dubbing’s actually well done and better than watching it sub-titled! What a novel concept.

Oh, and the Yankees lost today. As much as I’m bummed about it, I’m much happier for Detroit who made the playoffs this season and advanced after thirteen consecutive losing seasons. I just wish I didn’t have to read and hear fellow Yankee fans crying the goddamn blues for the next month because the team exited the playoffs in the first round.

======================================

While “surfing the net” as all the hip kids with holes and hair in their faces would say, I stumbled across an “online debate” that was nothing more than yet another contribution to the vast chasm of pointless debate (overflowing with logical fallacies) that’s so prevalent on the internet these days. One person contributed to this, but concluded his annoying rant with a fantastic quote from Carl Sagan that I’m compelled to share. Just because I liked it, not because it ellicited an emotional experience corollary to any personal issue(s) I might have or had.

In 1991, Voyager 1 sent back an image of Earth from what was at the time the furthest distance from which a snapshot of Earth had been recorded (that might still be the case – it’s too late for me to be completely thorough in my research for a journal entry). It’s a fairly famous image that shows what looks like an insignificant dot. I hope everyone was smiling or putting on their best “I firmly believe this picture is art because I’m not smiling in it” vacant stare.


Image snapped by Voyager 1. Taken from an article on Space.com.

In his book Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future, Sagan presented the photo and wrote the following:

“Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors, so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

Carl Sagan was one of those fantastic individuals that makes me hate myself for not being him/her, even if the film adaptation of “Contact” was BORRRRRRIIIIINNNNNNG. Note – never read the novel.

Christ, it’s almost 5:00am. That cup of coffee after dinner at the Dragon(?) Buffet was a mistake…but who cares? Weekends RULE! Too bad I have to work on Columbus Day. You know, it’s really a shame that I don’t get the day off to fully reflect on the Nina, Pinta, Santa Maria, and Columbus’s goofy goddamn hat.

More later…

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  1. October 8, 2006 at 1:56 pm

    Oh, I love Contact, both in movie and book form. So good. So good. I’m a geek.

    • October 8, 2006 at 8:41 pm

      Perhaps it’s one of those instances where if I read the book, I’d appreciate the film a little more. As it stands, though, the film bored me to tears.

  2. October 8, 2006 at 5:10 pm

    In 1991, Voyager 1 sent back an image of Earth from what was at the time the furthest distance from which a snapshot of Earth had been recorded (that might still be the case – it’s too late for me to be completely thorough in my research for a journal entry). It’s a fairly famous image that shows what looks like an insignificant dot. I hope everyone was smiling or putting on their best “I firmly believe this picture is art because I’m not smiling in it” vacant stare.

    (image snapped by Voyager 1. Taken from an article on Space.com.

    In his book Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future, Sagan presented the photo and wrote the following:

    “Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

    The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors, so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

    Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

    The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

    It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

    I would very much like you to repost that all in . *nodnod*

    Also: What you doing on the 15th? Wanna help us celebrate Greg getting totally old turning 40?

    • October 8, 2006 at 8:40 pm

      Done!

      The 15th? I should be free and it sounds fantabulous. I’ll let you know!

      GREG IS OLD! WHERE’S HIS WALKER? HAR HAR HAR HAR HAR

      • October 8, 2006 at 11:11 pm

        Superb! It is a fun surprise – his actual birthday is Saturday the 14th, so he won’t be expecting it. Meet us (and several others) at Shalimar on Washington at 6pm. Wear something nice. Not like, a tux, but… y’know. Nice. 😀

  3. October 8, 2006 at 9:34 pm

    Contact the novel was REALLY good, although I liked the movie too… The book is very different, for instance they send five people, not one.

    • October 9, 2006 at 12:54 am

      I should probably make an effort to read it.

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